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“The word suggests that we develop relationships not for the simple value of the person we call ‘friend,’ for the pleasure of being in a community of people and for the simple joys of sharing bonds of affection and common care, but that we instead develop these relationships out of some sort of expectation of a monetary reward.” – Collette Coullard, Sault Ste. Early in 2014, Steve Kaufman of Houston, Tex., could be heard screaming, “I’ve only heard it twice and already know by the end of the year I’ll want to scream.” “Short-form for ‘crazy’ and sometimes just one ‘cra.’ I hear kids (including my 6 yr. ‘That snowstorm yesterday was ‘cra-cra.'” – Esther Proulx, Sault Ste. Further, I am not aware of any team or mascot that has the carrying capacity to be a nation.” – Kelly Frawley, Waunakee, Wisc. “People have taken pictures of themselves for almost as long as George Eastman’s company made film and cameras. “I twitch when I hear twerk, for to twerk proves one is a jerk — or is at least twitching like a jerk. “Society is changing and no longer is it odd for a man to take care of his children. “Every passing storm or event is tagged as ice-ageddon or snow-pocalypse.

A self-snapped picture need not have a name all its own beyond ‘photograph.’ It may only be a matter of time before photos of one’s self and a friend will become ‘dualies.’ LSSU has an almost self-imposed duty to carry out this banishment now.” – Lawrence, Coventry, Conn. “The fastest over-used word of the 21st century.” – Sean, New London, NH. So, hashtag-knockitoff.” – Kuahmel, Gardena, Calif. “Used when talking about Twitter, but everyone seems to add it to everyday vocabulary. When running out of cashews becomes nut-ageddon, it’s time to re-evaluate your metaphors.” – Rob, Sellersville, Penn.

“The newest dictionary entry should leave just as quickly.” – Bruce, Edmonton, Alb. Now it is seeping from the Twittersphere into everyday expression. #annoying #stopthat #hashtag #hashtag #hashtag .” – Alex, Rochester, Mich. The 30-year anniversary of this hilarious 1983 Michael Keaton movie seems to have released some pent-up emotions. “It was a funny movie in its time, but the phrase should refer only to the film, not to men in the real world. ” says Pat, of Chicago, who suggests we peruse the website captaindad.org, the manly blog of stay-at-home parenting. Politicians never fail to disappoint in providing fodder for the list.

“A pretentious way of saying ‘selected.’ It’s enormously overused.” – Kristi Hoerauf, San Francisco, Calif. K., ‘takeaway’ food is known as ‘to go’ here in the Colonies. “Purely with reference to a specific teams’ fans, this word needs to go. “Let’s just keep with ‘shake yer booty’ — no need to ‘twerk’ it! “Come on down, we’re havin’ car-ageddon, wine-ageddon, budget-ageddon, a sale-ageddon, flower-ageddon, and so-on-and-so-forth-ageddon!

“A horrible word that conflates the real meaning of friendship with usually hidden motivations to get at the other person’s pockets.” – Mary Been, Sidnaw, Mich. It’s the following of a sports franchise, not a group seeking independence, recognition and legitimacy; Not even if it’s the Cubs.” – Tim Wilcox, Sault Ste. Canada “Although a devout Wisconsin sports fan, I do not belong to Packer-Nation, Badger-Nation, Phoenix-Nation, or Brewer-Nation. “Both politics and sports teams have overused this n-word to describe their fans or viewers.” – Ken Hornack, Ormond Beach, Fla. “Myselfie disparages the word because it’s too selfie-serving. Hi ho, hi ho, it’s away with twerk we must go.” – Michael, Haslett, Mich. says he responds, “T’werk,” when asked where he is headed on Monday mornings. None of these appear in the Book of Revelations.” – Michael, Haslett, Mich.

So the word that received the most nominations this year was already banished, but today it is being used differently than it was in 1999, when nominators were saying, “I am SO down with this list! “Currently, it is being overused as the first word in the answer to ANY question. It has replaced ‘discussion,’ ‘debate,’ ‘chat,’ ‘discourse,’ ‘argument,’ ‘lecture,’ ‘talk’…of which can provide some context to the nature of the communication. “Anything that the speaker finds vaguely inconvenient or undesirable, such as an opposing political belief or bad traffic.

For instance, “How did you learn to play the piano? Perhaps the users feel that it is a word that is least likely to offend people, but I consider it to be imprecise language that, over time, dumbs down the art of effective discourse.” – Richard Fry, Marathon, Ont. Contrast things that are self-evidently taken to be problematic with, say, actual problems like a hole in the ozone layer or a job loss.” – Adam Rosen, Asheville, N. “Often used with ‘engagement.’ If someone is disengaged, they’re not really a stakeholder in the first place.

” Answer: “So my dad was in a classical music club…” – Bob Forrest, Tempe Ariz. The word serves no purpose in the sentence and to me is like fingernails on a chalkboard. LSSU, please engage your stakeholders by adding this pretentious jargon to your list. Harley Carter of Calgary, Alberta, says he has heard it with another word popular in business-speak, “socialize,” which means to spread an idea around to see what others think of it.

So, I submit the extra, meaningless, and overused word ‘so.’” – Scott Shackleton, Sault Ste. “Politicians, especially, are using this word when asked a question and not answering said question. “Frequently used to begin a sentence, particularly in response to a question, this tiresome and grammatically incorrect replacement for “Like,” or “Um,” is even more irksome…It hurts my ears, every single time I hear it! “We need to socialize this concept with our ‘stakeholders.’” “Dr.

Just once, I would like to hear it referred to as a financial crisis.” Barbara CLIFF, Johnstown, Penn.

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